Endometrial Ablation

Endometrial ablation is a procedure that surgically destroys (ablates) the lining of your uterus (endometrium). The goal of endometrial ablation is to reduce menstrual flow. A doctor may consider bleeding between your menstrual periods, having a strong flow, or having long-term periods. If medicine does not assist, your doctor may suggest endometrial ablation.

There can be many causes for heavy menstrual bleeding. The reason may be to change hormones, or it might be increasing fibroid and polyps in your uterus.

Endometrial ablation generally isn’t recommended for everyone. You shouldn’t have performed it if you’re post-menopausal. Also, it’s not a good idea to have it done if you have certain abnormalities of the uterus, Cancer of the uterus, increased risk of uterine cancer, An active pelvic infection, A scar from a Caesarean section, An intrauterine device (IUD).

if you are pregnant or have plans for kid’s Endometrial ablation is not right for you asitwill make it harder for you to become pregnant or if you want a baby in the future. After endometrial ablation, pregnancy may happen. These pregnancies, however, could pose a greater danger to mom and child. Pregnancy may end with a miscarriage due to damage in the lining of the cervix, or the pregnancy might occur in the Fallopian tubes or cervix instead of the uterus (ectopic pregnancy). At the moment of the endometrial removal some kinds of sterilization can be performed. If you have endometrial ablation, it is suggested to avoid pregnancy with prolonged contraception or sterilization. Before taking the procedure, it is necessary to check for cancer, pregnancy, remove IUD if there is any in place.

Endometrial ablation isn’t surgery. The doctor doesn’t make any surgical cuts. Instead, she will insert very thin tools through your vagina to reach your uterus. The types will depend on what kind of ablation she does.

The most common are:

Hydro thermal: Your doctor gently pumps fluid into your uterus, then heats it. After 10 minutes, this destroys your uterine lining.

Balloon therapy: Your doctor guides a thin tube with a special balloon on the end into your uterus. Heated fluid fills the balloon, which then expands and breaks up the lining.

High-energy radio waves: Your doctor puts electrical mesh into your uterus and expands it. Then energy and heat sent by strong radio waves damage the lining, which your doctor removes with suction.

Freezing: A thin probe with a very cold tip freezes off the lining of your uterus. Your doctor may call this “cryoablation.”

Microwave: A special wand applies microwave energy to your uterine lining, which destroys it.

Electrical: Your doctor can use an electric current to destroy the lining of your uterus, but this method isn’t as commonly used as the others.

Sometimes doctors can do endometrial ablation in their office. Or you may need to go into the hospital if you need general anesthesia.

After endometrial ablation, you might experience:

  • Cramps. You may have menstrual-like cramps for a few days. Over-the-counter medications such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen can help relieve cramping.
  • Vaginal discharge. A watery discharge, mixed with blood, may occur for a few weeks. The discharge is typically heaviest for the first few days after the procedure.
  • Frequent urination. You may need to pass urine more often during the first 24 hours after endometrial ablation.

It might take a few days or weeks to see the final results, but endometrial ablation usually reduces the amount of blood lost during menstruation. Most women will have lighter periods, and some will stop having periods entirely. Your doctor will advise you not to have sex, use tampons, or douche for a few day. She may also set boundaries on your activity, such as not lifting heavy things straight away. If you need pain medicine, ask your doctor which over – the-counter medicines are secure to take.

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